Keeping nature’s perfect food perfect.
Mobile Menu
Search

Cholesterol in Eggs

Are Eggs High in Cholesterol?

Eggs do provide a significant amount of your daily recommendation of cholesterol. One large egg contains approximately 186 mg of cholesterol — more than half of the recommended daily intake. But did you know that eggs have a minimal effect on cholesterol levels and heart disease risk compared to saturated and trans fats?

When cooked in a healthy way, the nutrition of an egg outweighs the cholesterol amount. This means it’s best to avoid cooking eggs with bacon fat or butter or serving them with sides that are high in saturated fat.

Remember that cholesterol comes in two forms: LDL (bad cholesterol) and HDL (good cholesterol). Far from being inherently bad, cholesterol helps your body build cells. Health problems related to cholesterol can arise when too much LDL cholesterol builds up in the arteries.

But the cholesterol in eggs has almost no effect on blood cholesterol levels. Most healthy people can eat three eggs a day without negatively impacting their blood chemistry.

As long as you eat eggs in moderation, they should not pose a health risk. In fact, eggs provide vital protein and nutrients that you would lose by omitting them from your diet.

How Much Cholesterol Is in an Egg?

There are about 186 mg of cholesterol in one large egg — all contained in the egg yolk.

Egg whites are cholesterol-free, so if you’re watching your cholesterol, substitute whole eggs for just the egg whites. Simply scoop out the yolk and enjoy the egg whites as a high-protein, low-fat and low-cholesterol addition to any meal.

What’s the Healthiest Way to Cook Eggs for Reduced Cholesterol?

In general, the way you cook and eat your eggs does not significantly impact the cholesterol amount. Hard or soft boiled, fried or poached eggs and omelets all contain around 185 mg of cholesterol. Remember, egg whites contain zero cholesterol.

The healthiest way to enjoy your eggs is with the least amount of butter, fat and oil. The goal is to keep high levels of saturated and trans fats out of your meal. For example, frying egg whites in butter will add fat and cholesterol back into your dish. Opt for healthier cooking sprays like olive oil.

For a fat-free and cholesterol-free option, hard boil, soft boil or poach your eggs, then pop out the yellow yolk. These cooking methods are water-based, so they do not require the addition of oil. New to hard boiling or poaching? Check out our comprehensive guide on the most common ways to cook and eat your eggs.

We know that understanding the nutritional content of the food you feed your family is a priority. Learn more about the health benefits of eggs.

The Sauder Family Brings Fresh Eggs From Our Farms to Your Table

At Sauder’s Eggs, our goal is to keep nature’s perfect food, well, perfect. Our family has been a trusted egg supplier for more than 80 years. We partner with family-owned and operated farms that share our core values of quality, excellence and pride in serving your family. Our relationships with our farmers often go back several generations.

The happier the hen, the healthier the egg. That’s why Sauder’s Eggs is in the business of the humane treatment of our hens that produce our fresh and nutritious eggs. All Sauder’s Eggs products are endorsed with the United Egg Producers Certified seal, so you know our eggs come from happy hens.

Find the freshest dozen of Sauder’s Eggs at your nearest location by using our online store locator.